Tempramelt
How to Temper Chocolate — No Tempering Required

Wondering what tempramelt is? 

I must admit, I fabricated that word to reference a method of melting tempered chocolate in such a way, that it retains its temper. Here's why!

Most solid chocolate bought at the store is already in temper, and there is really no need to temper it.

We only need to ensure that the solid chocolates tempered state remains in the same β (beta) crystal formation (V Form), as when it was originally solid.

This particular method of melting to retain temper requires some exactness regarding temperature and attention to seizing.

There's a range of tools we can use to melt the chocolate in during this process such as a double boiler, microwave oven and other sources.

Using a double boiler is probably the most efficient method of tempering chocolate.  This bagging method may be the most effective way to melt while maintaining current temper.

How to Tempramelt Chocolate

Chef Tools You'll Need

Kitchen tools needed:
  • 20 quart pan (19 liters)
  • Steamer Insert Colander (Optional)
  • Thermometer - low temperature reading
  • Plastic Ziploc bag
  • Towels

In this application, we will use a bagging method in a warm 20 quart stock pot, or water bath.

That's along with a helpful colander or strainer that will fit nicely inside the stock pot.

The colander (strainer) helps remove things out of the pot that get away from me.

You will find the pot and strainer available individually over at Amazon.com for a reasonable price.

An even better value would be the stock pot set with lid and custom fit strainer that comes with the set.

The set comes in handy for more than just tempramelt, so it's definately the better buy. It always helps to have these type of chef tools around the kitchen.

Tempramelt It will work using the microwave, or double boiler too. You'll just need to experiment using the steps given here.

Just be diligent in maintaining the temperature (depending on the type of chocolate), at 88-90 °F (31.1-32.2 °C).

Step One:
Heating the Water

Fill pan 3/4 full with warm tap water.

  • Let the warm tap water run over the thermometer to monitor the water temperature while filling the pan.
  • Secure the thermometer to the inside of a steamer insert colander (or the inside of the pot) to monitor temperature throughout the melt. You may need to be inventive...
    ...like using a string to tie off the thermometer to the pots handle...
  • This worked well for me..., used a long twist-tie..., wrapping one end around the probe of the thermometer..., the other end wrapped around the colanders holding bracket.

Heat to a Maximum

Dark Chocolate 90 °F (32.2 °C)
Milk Chocolate 89 °F (31.6 °C)
White Chocolate 88 °F (31.1 °C)

Note: Stay on the high-end of these temperatures.

Example, for milk chocolate you would bring tap waters temperature to 89 °F (31.6 °C), and then slowly (ever so slightly) introduce more hot tap, just until the temperature reading dithers (fluctuates back and forth) between 89 °F (31.6 °C) and 90 °F (32.2 °C).

Step Two:
Melting Chocolate

Step Three:
Maintain the Melt

Briefly knead, or massage the chocolate in the bag.

  • Do this only to tell how far it has melted (You want smooth, no lumps)
  • Hands are going to be warmer than the water so don't knead too long.
  • If water temperature gets too warm or too cold, add a little cool (or warm) tap water at a time.
  • How to Get Chocolate From The Bag

    Once complete, you have a few choices as to how to get the chocolate out of the bag.

    1. Direct Dipping

    • Open the bag and then re-clip one side of the bag back onto the pan
    • Dip your chocolates.

    2. Piping

    • Remove the bag of chocolate and lay on towels Dry Completely. Ziploc area too
    • Lift one lower corner of the bag (so the chocolate flows away),
    • Snip the corner a little for piping, or to pour. Just be ready to use it all.

    3. Scooping

    • Place the bag of melted chocolate upright in a deep bowl.

    It will help to fold the edge of the bag opening over the edge of the bowl, then clip it to hold it up while you scoop out your chocolate.

    You now have tempramelt chocolate!

    Cool finished chocolates for about 5 minute per each 1/4 inch (0.64cm) in the refrigerator as needed.

    Do you have a different way to get the chocolate out of the bag?

    Let us know what you suggest!

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